GERMANY Emerges as Top Study Destination for Indians

education-in-germanyBetter immigration rules and low cost of education big draw

germany

There were 3,516 Indian students studying in Germany in 2008-09. Five years later in 2013-14, the number went up to 9,619, an increase of 200 per cent since the academic year 2008-09.

 

Data from German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), one of the largest funding organisation in the world supporting the international exchange of students and scholars, showed that on a year-on-year basis there was a 25.6 per cent rise in Indian students in that country in 2012-13, compared to 2011-12.

 

Better immigration rules, that facilitate and enable foreign students to stay back and look for employment compared to other regions in Europe and the US, and the lower costs of education are the reasons for the rise in the Indian student population in Germany. Overseas education consultants said while US is still the most preferred destination for Indian students wanting to go abroad, Germany is fast catching up.

 

Unlimited career opportunities is one of the main reasons for Indian students going to Germany. DAAD said the German parliament has implemented an European Union (EU) Blue Card and a new unlimited work and residence permit to grant foreign graduates of German universities unrestricted access to the job market.

 

After obtaining a degree from Germany, one can stay there for up to 1.5 years to look for suitable employment. DAAD said this has already started showing positive results.

 

“In Germany, education is heavily subsidised by the state and, therefore, most of the institutions of higher education charge no or very little tuition fee – to the tune of euro 500 per semester,” said DAAD in response to queries sent. DAAD also offers a number of scholarships for students with excellent academic record.

 

Education consultants also agree. Rohan Ganeriwala, co-founder of Collegify, an overseas education consulting firm, said now institutes in Germany have both German and English course material in the curriculum, unlike earlier when a large portion of the course material would be in German language.

 

Indian students in Germany
 Year Number of Indian students % increase (YOY)
2008-09 3516
2009-10 4070 15.76
2010-11 5038 23.78
2011-12 5998 19.06
2012-13 7532 25.58
2013-14 9619 27.7
 Source: Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)

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Apart from the fact that it is easier for international students to stay back and find a job in Germany, Ganeriwala said Germany is promoting itself as an upcoming destination with an open economy, and that has attracted students.

 

For getting a student visa to Germany, Level 2 German language knowledge is required for post-graduate courses. However, this requirement is not necessary for undergraduate. DAAD said to apply for a student visa for Germany, students need to have confirmed admission to a German university and approximately euro 8,000 in a blocked account in a German bank, among other requirements.

 

DAAD said the most popular course among Indian students are the programmes in the STEM subject fields (science, technology, engineering and mathematics), followed by economics, law and social sciences. Further, Indian students make up for one of the largest foreign doctoral candidates in the country, just behind China.

 

Moreover, knowing German is not mandatory. Vinayak Kamat, director, GeeBee Education, said there are many PhDs and few masters courses that do not need German language proficiency. He said the cost of education is very low, limited only to living cost.

 

Kamat said since German brands like Volkswagen and BMW are thriving in India, the visibility of German education has increased.

 

 

Courtsey: Buisiness Standard, Sept. 17th 2014.

Netherlands Higher Education

Dutch higher education – High quality in an international setting.

Higher education in Holland is known for its high quality and its international study environment. With more than 2,100 international study programmes and courses, it has the largest offer of English-taught programmes in continental Europe.

Binary system

Dutch higher education has a binary system, which means that you can choose between two types of education:

At a research university you will focus more on research-oriented work, which could be either in an academic or in a professional setting. At a university of applied sciences you can choose a professional programme in the applied arts and sciences, to prepare you for a specific career.

A third, smaller branch of higher education is provided by institutes for international education, which offer programmes designed especially for international students.

Three cycles

In 2002 Holland introduced the bachelor’s-master’s degree structure, but the distinction between the two types of education still exists. Both research universities and universities of applied sciences can award a bachelor’s or a master’s degree.

You first obtain a bachelor’s degree (first cycle), you can then continue to study for a master’s degree (second cycle). After completion of a master’s programme you can start a PhD degree or PDeng degree programme (third cycle).

Internship

Many students do an internship as part of their study programme. As a foreign student, you may also be interested in doing an internship in the Netherlands

German Education System

The educational system of Germany is undergoing  continuous changes and reforms. Main point in the last years was the reorganization of the Gymnasium. The nine year education was changed into an eight year education to get the Abitur. Furthermore, the academic system had changed because of the Bologna reform. The degrees obtained are now called Bachelor and Master.

Studying in Germany requires the graduate degree Abitur or the advanced technical college entrance qualification. International students have to show a similar graduate degree. Until now it was not possible to build a central organization for application and award of university places. Because of this the applications still need to be sent to every university or advanced technical college.

The admission requirements are also defined by the universities. Therefore, they can be different for the same subjects at different universities. In Germany there are three different kinds of advanced colleges or universities. Arts, film or music advanced colleges offer practical education in the artistic subjects. Advanced technical colleges however, cover the scientific and social subjects. They also set value on practical experiences in their education. The third category is the so called university. They offer all different kinds of subjects. Practical experience is an important point as well but the universities are especially famous for their firm theoretical education.

Another differentiation can be made between public and private universities. Public universities are financed by the government and do not charge tuition fees or just small amounts of money. Private universities in contrast are financed by the fees paid by students and these can be quite expensive. In Germany we can find much more public universities than the private ones. German law says that education should be offered to everyone and everyone should be able to afford adequate education. Therefore, in some states tuition fees were abolished in other states they are very small.

It is very useful to look at the DAAD website to learn more about the universities and the admissions etc…

Education in Ireland

Education in Ireland’s goals and objectives include:

  • To promote Ireland as a quality destination for students
  • To promote and support the international activities of Irish education institutions
  • To act as a national point of contact and referral to and from Irish suppliers of education services and the international market place
  • To promote Irish education expertise as a valuable resource for international institutions, development agencies and governments
  • To liaise with education interests and government to identify and remove barriers to the development of the international education sector

Leading Global Companies in Ireland

Companies who require a skilled, educated and highly capable workforce to drive their success chose to locate in Ireland. Despite a worldwide recession, Ireland continues to attract a huge amount of foreign direct investment (FDI), in fact, Ireland is the second most attractive country globally for FDI – after Singapore. Over 1,000 FDI giants in ICT, Social Media, Pharmaceuticals and Finance have made Ireland the hub of their European operations, with names such as Google, HP, Apple, IBM, Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter, Pfizer, GSK and Genzyme.

A report ‘Investing in Ireland’ – a survey of foreign direct investors – shows that 97pc of multinational executives plan on maintaining their current stake in Ireland. The survey, conducted by the Economist Intelligence Unit shows that the areas of financial services, technology and pharmaceuticals will account for the majority of new jobs.

Irish exports are now at record levels and currently outstripping imports by 2 to 1 providing a huge healthy trade surplus the envy of countries multiple times the size of Ireland.

Apart from a strong foreign owned multinational sector, Ireland also has vibrant indigenous industries. Companies competing on the world stage including CRH, Smurfit Kappa, DCC, Glen Dimplex, Greencore, Kingspan, NTR and Paddy Power.

Half of the medical technology companies in Ireland are Irish and there is a vibrant software sector exporting mainly to the UK and the US. Ireland has a natural competitive advantage in the food and drinks sector. Ireland is the largest exporter of beef in Europe and fourth largest in the world, in fact one in five beef burgers eaten daily in McDonald’s restaurants across Europe is made from Irish beef.

Education in Ireland’s goals and objectives include:

  • To promote Ireland as a quality destination for students
  • To promote and support the international activities of Irish education institutions
  • To act as a national point of contact and referral to and from Irish suppliers of education services and the international market place
  • To promote Irish education expertise as a valuable resource for international institutions, development agencies and governments
  • To liaise with education interests and government to identify and remove barriers to the development of the international education sector
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